Monday, October 28, 2013

The Art of Calm (A trip to Kentucky)

Kentucky is a beautiful state. I never appreciated this growing up, because (and I honestly have no idea where this came from) I had a deeply-seeded resentment of anything south of the Mason-Dixon line. Still, late fall, stress from school and eventual early adulthood brings with it dreams of hibernation, home and pie. Being able to  spend all day in pajamas is also high on my list these days. So after coming back to Memphis to visit my family for fall break, we took a road trip to Kentucky. The entire drive, I stared out the window, slightly out of breath over the forgotten beauty of so many rolling green hills. It seems I've developed some kind of armor to protect me from life in the northeast and, in the process, I have neglected to look up at the sky. Like Icarus, I flew too close to the sun. It takes coming home to realize you never needed wings in the first place.

I won't pretend I'm a sophisticated northerner. I speak more slowly than many people I know; I don't own any Ray-Bands or black high heels or know all the subway lines in Manhattan. Still, I'm noticing some stark differences between the vast, expansive south and the busy, densely populous northeast. For one, in the drive from Memphis to Kentucky, I saw more trees than people. More trees, more leaves on the trees, more blades of grass, more fish in the lakes, even more clouds in the sky. There is somehow more sky.

When the only thing you have to contest your existence against is something that's existed for hundred of years, like a tree, you suddenly feel very, very small. It's almost impossible  be existential in a city! There are too many people telling you you're wonderful, and not enough reminding you that the trees were here first.

Also down south, people...are just so friendly. I always thought this was a myth, that people in the south are friendlier than in the north. "Just because people down south smile and wave and say 'hello' as if they mean it doesn't make them more friendly." Perhaps I will test this some time and see how long I can talk to a stranger in Memphis or Bowling-Green before he or she gets bored or scared of me. But at least when people greet me with a boisterous "hello," I know they really mean it. You know that awkward semi-acknowledgement of a stranger's presence, where you're too shy and too busy to be genuinely interested in someone else's day, but you don't want that person to think a bad thought about you so you smile and eek out a timid "hi," and the other person blurts out, "Hihow'sitgoin'?" and then just keeps walking? Yeah. In the south, strangers greet strangers with genuineness. And they separate their words.


Perhaps what I'm experiencing is a bit of rose colored glasses syndrome, that feeling you get when you're in a new place, when you're exhausted from what you've left behind, and you look at your present surroundings with admiration and bliss. To tell the truth, I never thought so rosily about the south when I lived there.

In fact, all I remember dreaming of (aside from other planets) was my fantasized, grown up life in New York City. So perhaps now as a young adult, I've begun to reverse the fantasy and trade skyscrapers for landscapes and subway lines for tractors. Or haystacks...

Our time in Kentucky was full of farms, animals, fresh air and Mennonites markets. I overheard the boy pictured at left (click to see the detail) speaking Dutch with his father, owner of the first Mennonite farm we visited, where my own father proceeded to buy over a hundred dollars worth of squash! Seriously.

I watched this boy, about ten, grab a basket and pluck a few leaves of kale from the stalk and then mosey on back up to his house, to sell it or to eat it.

I admit I was jealous. When I want to cook kale, I need a car, a shopper of the month card, cash, car keys, a wallet, and the patience to walk under halogen lights and stand in line at a conveyor belt while trying to ignore all the celebrity gossip and "HOW TO LOSE TWENTY POUNDS IN TWO DAYS!" advertisements.
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Perhaps this trip was exactly what I needed. Blue skies and sunshine. Apple pie, baseball games, harmonicas and dogs on my lap. I had no idea I was so...American.

"Country rooooad, take me hoooome, to the place I beloooong!"


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