Monday, July 27, 2015

Magical Myanmar

Four months later and I'm writing again. There's a lot to be said and many apologies to be made but for now I'll say that I'm home in America almost fully recovered from a nasty parasite and spending quality time with family. I don't plan to return to Thailand, but I don't think this is the end of my wanderlust. I'd love to give this blog a makeover and write about travelling even while stateside, but I will need a few boot-camp classes in technology first!

Anyway, I want to write about Myanmar. Myanmar is unlike any other place I've been, and I think it was the best time I had. Here's why: it really does make a difference when you give yourself plenty of time to spend in-country (especially if you're going to buy a visa anyway). I spent nearly three weeks in Myanmar; I could've easily spent four, but I hadn't planned for four so my money was low, and as it turns out, that timing was perfect. I got infected (>.<) the day before I was scheduled to fly back to Bangkok. 

Here's what I loved about Myanmar: when you start exploring, you start to feel like you're stepping back in time or into a fantasy world. There is so much natural beauty in that land, and it feels pristine and untouched. Coupled with an unbelievable history and the strong yet gentle spirits of the locals, and I quickly understood why so many people claimed Myanmar as their favorite stop in Southeast Asia. It's just different. 

Understandably so. Myanmar (formerly Burma) had been closed off since its 1962 military coup and engulfed in civil war and war crimes for the past 60 years. According to Wikipedia, the military junta official "dissolved" in 2011 (the same year that the Lonely Planet guide was published, incidentally), but things had been loosening since the late 2000s. Still, when I went, there were in fact some ATMs and even whispers of Wifi, but nothing as self-serving as the resorts of Thailand. And that is exactly what I wanted.

Hiking the mountains in northern Shan State. Can you spot the tiny dots in the foreground? Those are houses.

In Myanmar, I hiked above the clouds, learned how to spot green tea plants, met the niece of the last Shan princess to rule in Northern Shan state before the military takeover, walked barefoot over sun-soaked marble temple paths, and climbed a lot of pagodas. A lot of pagodas.

One of the several thousand temples left standing in dusty Bagan.

We also did a self-guided city tour of former capital Yangon (Rangoon) where we spotted old mossy-grown British colonial buildings, the famous Strand Hotel, the old Post hub and other relics from a century long occupation.

Old governmental meeting house built under British occupation in Yangon (formerly Rangoon).


I didn't really want to leave, but my body and my wallet felt otherwise, and so with a heavy heart and a weak stomach I departed Yangon for Bangkok three weeks after I touched down in Mandalay. I took a total of two fifteen hour overnight buses (with varying degrees of comfort), climbed an ungodly number of steps, and drank about seventy-five cups of green tea. Watch the video below to see how villagers in the Pa'Oh mountains in northern Shan State gather and process hundreds of pounds of tea!! (The video turns direction at one point...sorry about that, but trust me, it's so cool!)

video

I miss travelling. Until next time, I'll relish the pictures, the stories, the teacups and the hand-rolled Burmese cigars. Ahh, the simple life!




With love,
Mel

2 comments:

  1. Love and miss you! Happy to hear about your travels anytime!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you Shannon! I love you and miss you too. Thanks for reading :)

    ReplyDelete