Saturday, August 8, 2015

Is Writing Selfish? Or Is It Service?

When trying to live a life of service to God and to others, what room is there for egotism? Where does egotism end and our God-given gifts begin?

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I've been state-side for one month now, with little to occupy my time other than my own thoughts and the warm comfort of friends and family. As I sit in my little, cluttered home, replete with dog hair and worn-down magazines, I think and pray a lot, maybe too much, about my own future.

I long to continue my education, which leads most well meaning folks to ask me, "what do you want to do as a career?" My usual response is "I don't know," which elicits sighs and confusion, mostly from myself.

The truth is, I think I do know, but I don't feel like admitting it. I want to write. And read. And study. As a career. That seems like something that's impossible to exhaust...study. One man can't ever know everything so how much more can we use this life to learn? I think now of one of my favorite little memoirs, Twenty Years A Growin,' where the narrator gleans this advice to me:

"What good are you unless you study and travel the world while you are in it?"

I take these words to heart and often feel that there's so much to see and do and learn that I couldn't ever possibly choose just one path and stick to it. But maybe this is just naivete.

As I contemplate the possible paths before me, I try to see into the future and imagine what would be required of me in a certain setting. How much of myself would I be required to give? How much of myself would I have to die to? In the Christian context, walking with Christ means dying to yourself, taking up your cross (your burdens--see Pilgrim's Progress) and following Christ.

But how much of me is what I need to die to, and how much of me is given by God to fulfill?

If God gave me a talent for writing or speaking (not saying He did, but I'm certainly no accountant), then shouldn't I use it for Him? But writing is a very personal activity, and these days I feel like I'm spending too much time alone, in my own head, instead of being present with others.

How much of me needs to die to be filled up instead with Christ?

It's easy to discern external sins: avarice, greed, addiction, egotism, things that we all struggle with. Sometimes our failings manifest themselves externally in our relationships with others, our addictions to material things, or something else. But sometimes they sink deep inside our skin, and we don't realize they are there until we try to break ourselves free and instead feel chained to our own sloth, our own internal egotism that sits quietly beneath our breath.

Is this my cross?

If it is, how can I follow Jesus on a path that would confront me with more of the same...the long, solitary afternoons, alone with my books and my thoughts? Our thoughts can sometimes betray us.

Maybe I'm giving myself too much credit. I'm not a hermit...not yet, anyway, and I do love the great outdoors. It's just that sometimes I love my pajamas more.

Is writing an inherently selfish endeavor? A good writer writes with an audience in mind, with a story to tell, with an argument to posit. Sometimes I just write because I can't sit still unless I do. Oh, the novelty.

I wonder what it would be like to follow a path of academia, of writing and thinking and listening and learning and trying to convince others I'm right when I secretly know I'm not. Or what if I know I am? Maybe that's even worse. Or maybe academia, like any other path, is not about being right or wrong but about growing and discovering and being present with others as you walk the road together. Is that naivete again?

What do you think, sage bloggers or writers? How do you reconcile your time in your head with your time serving others? Is writing selfish, or is it a form of service?

3 comments:

  1. If this is a representative sample of your work, then I would say you are a very gifted writer. This post made me smile with surprise more than once, and that pretty much never happens. I have no doubt you will excel at whatever you put your mind to doing.

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  2. I agree with Drew. I also believe that life is about balance and achieving such a balance can take a lifetime. In the meantime, learning to love God and one's neighbor as oneself is a full time job. Whatever you do, if it is done with an attitude of gratitude, then you are successful ( assuming of course that what you do isn't hurting anyone).And keeping your childlike innocence in a world of depravity will serve you well.

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  3. Thank you Drew and Julie. At this point in my life I feel like finding something to put my mind to isn't the issue, it's trying to find the quiet voice that tells me that what I'm putting my mind to is worthy of God. I wonder if other people find this struggle, or if sometimes people just know. Either way, prayer is where I need to go. It always is. Thanks for reminding me and for sharing your thoughts! I appreciate them very much.

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