Monday, August 24, 2015

Post-Grad: Making the Best of The Time You Have

A cliche title, but this is how I feel right now...

And once again, boxes are packed and suitcases are standing in my bedroom. Where I am going this time? It's tempting to say "nowhere," but that isn't true. I'm moving back home.

Such a short sentence carries with it so much weight and societal pressure, doesn't it?

I've been blessed to spend some time with my wonderful college friends this weekend in New Jersey, where I've been for the past week, packing boxes, visiting family and tying up loose ends before I move back to Memphis. One of the things we talked a lot about is how odd it is not to have that structure of school looming over us. This time of year is when students move back to campus, start planning their courses and their extra-curriculars, and begin that carousel dance of "what ifs" and wishes for their still mostly ethereal futures.

Only this time, and for the first time (since I graduated college and then went straight to teaching at a university), there is no class schedule to pick! No courses to look forward to, no projects to plan, no books to check out or social events to make. I try and tell myself that I'll still be as studious, reading for pleasure and edification and cross referencing everything I see on paper. But the truth is, even in the month and a half since I've been jobless in America, it's been really difficult to create any sort of routine that challenges me.

All of my caring older adult friends and family will smile and shrug and say encouraging things like "you don't need to know what you're doing forever; you just need to know what you're doing next." And this is true, and I'm very grateful for their understanding and support. Yet I'm wondering if this is the part of life, that dreaded post-college part, that people don't really explain in detail because it's different for everyone, and maybe uncomfortable as well.

And so I've been spending this last week living a bit in nostalgia-land, which I believe every person is entitled to at some points in life. I visited my old college and church, had lots of lunches and coffees and lots of talks, and started going through my old belongings, at which point I realized that I'm a book hoarder. I also discovered this insert from my old environmental biology book, which explains a lot:

A fold out map I found under my bed today.

I also found some old travel pieces from The Inquirer, old essays I wrote for school and lots of notes about random ideas in life. My brain, it seems, has always been running overtime.

One article I had saved was a piece by Rick Steves on the relative simplicity of backpacking in the age of technology, with which I wholeheartedly agree. His last bit of advice was to always keep a travel journal. He observes:

One of my favorite discoveries is that the journal entries I wrote as a scruffy 20-year-old in 1975 still resonate with the...20-year-old American exploring Europe in the 21st century.

I find this encouraging and inspiring. There's something so liberating and magical about being your own Robinson Crusoe or Sherlock Holmes in a foreign land, even if you can now follow that land on twitter. There's nothing like being there in person.

And this is why, as a newly jobless post-grad, joining the ranks of the wandering millennials, I feel hopeful about my future. Yes, it is so much more challenging to make things happen now. In college, everything is arranged neatly for you; you have endless options from which to choose. You see your friends all the time. You have access to databases, free Zumba classes, trips to the beach, and all the ice cream you can eat. Those things still exist in life (maybe not the free Zumba); you just have to find them for yourself now.

Look at the map. Look at Rick Steves. We have a whole world still to explore, and even in our own backyard or old college town, we can find uncharted territory. Everything and everyone has a story, and since human beings are naturally curious, it is only fitting that we seek to uncover those stories, no matter where we are physically. If you're looking for a place to start, try your old journals, essays, or random scraps of paper stuffed under your bed.

:)

Note:
Rick Steves, "It's Easier to be a Backpacker," for the Inquirer, Sunday July 28, 2013. Inquirer.com


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